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MONDAY, MAY 5, 2014

GENERAL TOPICS
8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

“Mechanics of Wiredrawing”
Joseph P. Domblesky, Marquette University, USA
This course covers basic engineering principles and process calculations that are used in wiredrawing processes for metal rods and wires. Topics that will be covered include material heat-up during drawing and friction. Calculating reductions and draw forces for sizing drawing stands using standard engineering formulas will also be considered. Also the effect of alloy chemistry will be considered on drawing performance along with an overview of common die materials.
Joseph P. Domblesky is an associate professor in the mechanical engineering department at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, where he teaches manufacturing processes/enigneering and performs research in mass finishing and metal forming. He also teaches a workshop in die stress analysis for the cold and hot forming industries. He has been with Marquette since 1996. He previously held positions at General Motors and MSW Inc. as a manufacturing engineering and tool room supervisor. He holds BS and MS degrees in industrial engineering from Penn State University and a PhD in metal forming from Ohio State University. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in Wisconsin.

9:15 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
“Drawing Dies”
Thomas Maxwell Jr., Die Quip Corp., USA
This presentation focuses on the die, the most important part of the drawing process. Without it, the best drawing machines, lubricant, and treatment systems cannot reduce the wire diameter. However, with a die, vice pliers, and a hammer, wire can be drawn, albeit slowly, as it has been for over 2,000 years. The intention of this course is to provide an understanding of what makes a die work, how it is designed, causes of failure, and problems with drawing larger sizes.
Tom Maxwell Jr. is president of Die Quip Corp., Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, USA. He holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial technology-management from California University of Pennsylvania and an associate’s degree in tool and die design from Alliance College. He is a former member of WAI’s board of directors, member relations committee, exhibition planning committee, and conference programming committee; past chairman of the exhibition planning committee; and past president of the Ohio Valley Chapter.

10:15 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
“Wiredrawing Lubricant Technology”
David Gzesh, Blachford Corporation, USA
The heat generated in the wiredrawing process significantly affects the lubricant properties in the die gap. The amount of generated heat is influenced by the interaction of the lubricant with factors that include the metal composition, surface preparation, speed, and other process variables. Selecting the best lubricant for a given wiredrawing application can be challenging due to the seemingly limitless number of combinations of processing variables and the lubricant types that are available today. This course looks at  the impact of a lubricant’s chemical and physical characteristics, in particular, the viscosity and chemistry influence on the lubricant selection process.
David Gzesh is an application specialist with Blachford Corporation, USA. He has been developing and servicing metal-working lubricants for over 35 years. During this time, he became a senior product chemist for the various successors of the RH Miller Company beginning with Pennwalt, Elf Atochem, Henkel, and Condat. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh. He is a longtime member of the Wire Association International, the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers, and the American Chemical Society.

11:00 a.m. - 11:45 p.m.
"Wire Breaks & Surface Damage"
Horace Pops, Horace Pops Consulting Inc., USA
This course presents a classification of wire breaks from a perspective that compares material defects to process-related problems. Rod defects will include both casting and rolling issues such as internal voids, foreign contaminants, rolled-in scale, hot cracks, and surface porosity. The effects of wiredrawing speed and lubrication will be discussed with respect to generation of fines, shaving, galling, and other surface defects.
Horace Pops is president of Horace Pops Consulting, Inc., Ft. Wayne, Indiana, USA. He previously was director, metals laboratory at Superior Essex in Ft. Wayne. He holds an Sc.D. degree from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.Met.E. degree from Lehigh University, and a B.Met.E. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He was president of the Wire Association International from 1992 to 1993. He has received numerous honors from WAI, including its Mordica and Donnellan Memorial Awards as well as 16 paper awards spanning 1976 to 2008. He is the sole or co-holder of 10 patents.

FERROUS TRACK
1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

“Fundamentals of Ferrous Metallurgy”
Anand Bhagwat, Minova International, USA
This introductory course is designed to provide a general understanding of ferrous metallurgical concepts, including phase equilibrium, transformation, strengthening mechanisms, heat treatment, and an overview of steelmaking, and their relevance to the wire technology.
Anand Bhagwat is Mining Bolting System Lead at Minova International, a Ground Support company for the mining industry. Before joining Minova, he was plant manager at FENIX, LLC, a subsidiary of Seneca Wire Group. He was managing director of WAI Wire and Cable Services, Pvt. Ltd., Pune, India from 2006 to 2009. He has experience in wire manufacturing processes, quality, product development and failure analysis, and development of steel rod suppliers. He holds an M.B.A. degree and an M.S. degree in Materials Science, both from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, and a B.S. degree in metallurgy from the College of Engineering, Pune, India. He also holds six patents in wire and tire reinforcement technology.

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
“Ferrous Testing and Properties”
C. Richard Gordon, Gerdau Long Steel North America, USA
This course discusses tensile, coiling, wrap, reverse bend, torsion, fatigue, and hardness testing procedures. It illustrates interpretation of test results in terms of sample properties. It also presents practical exercises of data analysis.
C. Richard Gordon is technical service metallurgist at Gerdau Long Steel North America–Beaumont Steel Mill. He has over 30 years’ experience in the steel and wire industries. He previously worked with the National Standard Company managing groups working in the areas of R&D, quality, and process technology for carbon steel and stainless steel wire products. He is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology with master’s and B.S. degrees in metallurgical and materials engineering. He serves on the Board of Directors for the ASM International’s Notre Dame Chapter and is also a member of ASTM, TMS, and WAI.

2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
"Heat Treatment"
C. Richard Gordon, Gerdau Long Steel North America, USA
This course focuses on heat treatment of ferrous metals. It includes basic principles applicable to many metals with examples related to heat treatment of steel. It reviews the effect of furnace atmosphere and common reactions responsible for oxidation and other atmosphere/metal reactions.
C. Richard Gordon is technical service metallurgist at Gerdau Long Steel North America–Beaumont Steel Mill. He has over 30 years’ experience in the steel and wire industries. He previously worked with the National Standard Company managing groups working in the areas of R&D, quality, and process technology for carbon steel and stainless steel wire products. He is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology with master’s and B.S. degrees in metallurgical and materials engineering. He serves on the Board of Directors for the ASM International’s Notre Dame Chapter and is also a member of ASTM, TMS, and WAI.

3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
"Cleaning & Coating of Rod and Wire"
Jack McAfee, Rudy Vey, Ed Davis, Chemetall US, USA
This course presents the fundamentals of cleaning, pickling, and coating of ferrous wire and rod in preparation for drawing and processing. Proper control and handling in these areas ensures quality of the finished product. The design of these processes impacts the economics of the operation. It is imperative that rather than individual stages, this department should be viewed as a whole as it is critical to success. The course deals with zinc phosphate processes and the advantages and limitations as well as specialty coatings such as salt carriers, lubricants, dry film polymers, and new technologies on the horizon.
Dane Armendariz is industry manager for Chemetall U.S. Inc., New Providence, New Jersey, USA. A veteran of more than 30 years in the surface treatment industry, Armendariz he retired in 2012 as Business Development Manager for Henkel Corporation. He has worked in the fields of zinc phosphate, specialty coatings, drawing compounds, and most processes used in the treatment of ferrous metals. Most recently, he worked primarily with new processes and environmentally friendly products for the wire, tube, and stainless steel industries. A Pittsburgh native, he holds a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh. He is a past president of WAI, having served as president for 2010. A WAI member since 1993, he served two terms as a member of the Board of Directors, and also served on the Executive Committee. He served on the Oversight Committee, co-chaired the Conference Programming Committee and was chairman of the Suppliers Management Committee, where he served from 1996 until the committee was reorganized. He has served on the Exhibition Planning Committee and was a member of the Interwire Site Evaluation Task Force in 2004. In addition to serving as Interwire committee chairman in 2005, he has served on organizing committees for Interwire in 1999 and Wire Expo in 1998 and 2004. He also participated in the 2003 establishment of the Ohio Chapter ofWAI. He has served both as a board member and secretary for the chapter.

NONFERROUS/ELECTRICAL TRACK
1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
“Annealing of Electrical Conductors”
Horace Pops, Horace Pops Consulting Inc., USA
This course addresses principles of annealing, annealing of copper and aluminum wire, and annealing problems. Specific topics include definitions, structure—property changes, general concepts, engineering rules and guidelines, stages of annealing, role of work hardening; also, effects of composition, interaction of impurities, control of process variables (amount of reduction; intermediate anneals), measurement of annealing process, rate of softening, batch versus strand annealing; and annealability testing, purity and equipment problems, oxidation and staining, measurement of properties, hydrogen embrittlement, sticky wire, and frictional heating during drawing.
Horace Pops is president of Horace Pops Consulting, Inc., Ft. Wayne, Indiana, USA. He previously was director, metals laboratory at Superior Essex in Ft. Wayne. He holds an Sc.D. degree from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.Met.E. degree from Lehigh University, and a B.Met.E. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He was president of the Wire Association International from 1992 to 1993. He has received numerous honors from WAI, including its Mordica and Donnellan Memorial Awards as well as 16 paper awards spanning 1976 to 2008. He is the sole or co-holder of 10 patents.

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
"Formation & Measurement of Fines"
Horace Pops, Horace Pops Consulting Inc., USA
This course presents an analysis of the origin, microstructures, and make-up of fines in nonferrous products during rod production and wiredrawing. It includes a morphological genus for these contaminants leading to descriptions of eight different formation mechanisms—surface oxides, abrasive and third body wear, adhesive wear, slivers, surface deformation, delamination, and chemical compounds. It also includes a new method to quantitatively determine the fines-potential of rod samples.
Horace Pops is president of Horace Pops Consulting, Inc., Ft. Wayne, Indiana, USA. He previously was director, metals laboratory at Superior Essex in Ft. Wayne. He holds an Sc.D. degree from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.Met.E. degree from Lehigh University, and a B.Met.E. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He was president of the Wire Association International from 1992 to 1993. He has received numerous honors from WAI, including its Mordica and Donnellan Memorial Awards as well as 16 paper awards spanning 1976 to 2008. He is the sole or co-holder of 10 patents.

2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
“Extrusion, Part 1”
Erik A. Macs, Progressive Machinery Inc., USA
Part 1 starts with a review of the basic polymers typically used in the wire and cable process and is followed by explanation of the basic design of a thermoplastic extruder—barrel and liners, feed section, drive system, gearbox and thrust bearing, heating/cooling system, and pellet feeding. Special emphasis is placed on the varieties of screw design.
Erik A. Macs is VP, Sales/Marketing, for Progressive Machinery Inc. He previously was vice president of sales for Fine International Corp. Prior to that, he directed sales and marketing activities for Thermoplastics Engineering Corporation. He also held a number of positions that include production planner at the Entwistle Company, extrusion foreman with Dennison Manufacturing; technical specialist with Union Camp Corporation; materials research associate engineer with Judd Wire; and director of research and development for American Durafilm Company. He has a degree in mechanical engineering from Central New England College. Macs, who joined WAI in 1991, was the recipient of WAI’s 2013 Donnellan Memorial Award, which honors an individual’s contributions to the Association, as well as WAI’s 2004 President’s Award for extraordinary volunteer service. He served two terms on the board of directors. He is a member of the Education Committee, Member Relations Committee, and Paper Awards Committee, of which he previously was chairman. In the past he served on the Electrical Management Committee, Website Advisory Board, and WAI’s Technical Council. A director of the New England Chapter of WAI, he also served as that chapter’s president in 2000. He developed the seminar “Introduction to Insulated Wire Manufacturing” which was presented by the New England chapter in 2001 and 2002. He has chaired the Fundamentals of Wire Manufacturing program since 2007, frequently serving as a course moderator.

 3:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
“Extrusion, Part 2”
Erik A. Macs, Progressive Machinery Inc., USA
Part 2 covers the design considerations of the remaining components of extrusion lines. Items discussed include payoffs, dancers and accumulators, preheaters, crossheads, cooling troughs, capstans, online measurement and testing, printing, take-ups, and control systems. A brief review of typical troubleshooting tips is included if time permits.
Erik A. Macs is VP, Sales/Marketing, for Progressive Machinery Inc. He previously was vice president of sales for Fine International Corp. Prior to that, he directed sales and marketing activities for Thermoplastics Engineering Corporation. He also held a number of positions that include production planner at the Entwistle Company, extrusion foreman with Dennison Manufacturing; technical specialist with Union Camp Corporation; materials research associate engineer with Judd Wire; and director of research and development for American Durafilm Company. He has a degree in mechanical engineering from Central New England College. Macs, who joined WAI in 1991, was the recipient of WAI’s 2013 Donnellan Memorial Award, which honors an individual’s contributions to the Association, as well as WAI’s 2004 President’s Award for extraordinary volunteer service. He served two terms on the board of directors. He is a member of the Education Committee, Member Relations Committee, and Paper Awards Committee, of which he previously was chairman. In the past he served on the Electrical Management Committee, Website Advisory Board, and WAI’s Technical Council. A director of the New England Chapter of WAI, he also served as that chapter’s president in 2000. He developed the seminar “Introduction to Insulated Wire Manufacturing” which was presented by the New England chapter in 2001 and 2002. He has chaired the Fundamentals of Wire Manufacturing program since 2007, frequently serving as a course moderator.

 Schedule subject to change.

 

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