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Peter J Stewart-Hay

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Peter J Stewart-Hay

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About Me

Personal Information

Gender
Male
About me
A university trained Professional Mechanical Engineer, registered in the Province of Ontario, Canada.

A wire and cable manufacturing engineering specialist with over 35 years hands on experience.

Company Information

Company
Stewart-Hay Associates
Address
Unit 51, 1814 Shore Road
London, Ontario Canada
N6K 0C6
City / Town
London
State
Ontario
Country
Canada
Land phone
519 6413212
Website
http://www.Stewart-Hay.com

Background

College / University
U of M
Graduation Year
1968
Degree/Certifications
B Sc. M.E.
Skills and Expertise
A university trained Professional Mechanical Engineer, registered in the Province of Ontario, Canada.

A wire and cable manufacturing engineering specialist with over 35 years hands on experience.

Recent activities

  • Dear Mr. Anbunathan,

    Generally speaking, wire is bunched to provide flexibility so strands do not break when the cable is threaded through the house during construction. This could create hot spots by higher resistance where the strands are broken and afire could ensue.. Every country has specifications as to the way the the building cable is manufactured and cable manufacturing companies cannot go outside of these specifications.

    Electricity follows each of the individual strands so the shorter the pitch of the bunch, the higher the weight of the conductor and the higher the resistance.

    To calculate the weight of metal, look at the bunch and measure the length of the strand as the strand rotates 180 degrees and measure the angle of the strand. This is the hypotenuse of a right angle triangle so the longitudinal weight of the conductor can be easily calculated. This longitudinal weight will always be less than the helical weight.

    The lightest longitudinal weight would be that of a solid conductor.

    The whole idea of a stranded conductor is to use the longest allowable strand pitch and the nominal conductor resistance. This will give you the minimum conductor weight that the specification allows.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 5 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Aliminium magnet wire' in the forum.
    Hello Mohsen,

    Because I am not a magnet wire expert, we are fortunate enough to have a magnet wire expert to technical information on occasion and I have advised him of this thread. He is very busy however and I note he has not replied at this point in time.

    Therefore, as a first approach, I suggest you contact Boockman Engineering GmbH in Germany www.boockmann.com/ and explain to them your precise requirement including giving them with the specification data on the aluminum drawing oil you are using. Likewise ask them to recommend the correct solvent you should be using.

    On their web site, go to the Helicord section on the bottom left of the front page.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 14 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Ceramifiable LSOH compound' in the forum.
    From Linkdin we learned the following today:

    James Law Manager at Shenzhen Anpin Silicone Material Co., Ltd. advised that apart from their company,
    "According our customer's feedback, they used Wacker, Dow Corning, Bluestar, and Shinestu ceramifiable compounds Hope it is a reference for you."

    These may all be ceramifiable silicone rubber compounds.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 20 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Ceramifiable LSOH compound' in the forum.
    Hello Bhognath:

    AEI is world famous for their specialty compounds All compound manufacturers then work very hard to get their particular compound specified in one or more standards.

    I have no understanding of any other compound that will pass British Standard 6387, Categories C, W & Z. This is a specification for performance requirements for cables required to maintain circuit integrity under actual fire conditions. You also indicated that this is a ceramifiable compound meaning that it is a polymer–ceramic composite.

    If this is a PVC based compound:, Alibaba.com lists a number of Chinese companies that manufacture low smoke, zero halogen compounds www.alibaba.com/halogen-free-cable-compound-manufacturers.html but you will have to do the legwork there to see if you can find one or more that fit the complete requirements.

    Likewise AlphaGary Wire and Cable products may have something. I suggest you contact them:

    AlphaGary Corporation
    170 Pioneer Drive
    Leominster, MA 01453 USA
    www.alphagary.com/

    I suggest you ask them two questions:

    1) Do they have such a compound and if not,
    2) Can they recommend a reliable North American or European compounder besides AEI

    You have made this very difficult for us because we are not going to purchase the expensive BS specification for your query and you have not given us the compound number and type of the approved AEI compound. We therefore have little understanding as to the actual polymer compound you are referencing.and how it is processed.

    Perhaps the cable is manufactured with ceramifiable silicone rubber tapes from say Shenzhen Anpin Silicone Material Co., Ltd. (Guangdong, China) www.ecvv.com/product/4334703.html or with a ceramifiable silicone rubber compound.

    We do however suspect that it is actually a ceramifiable silicone rubber compound. We have posted your question on a number of worldwide Linkdin wire and cable groups but so far there has been no reply.]
    Read More...
    kunena.post 32 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Ceramifiable LSOH compound' in the forum.
    Hello Bhognath:

    AEI is world famous for their specialty compounds All compound manufacturers then work very hard to get their particular compound specified in one or more standards.

    I have no understanding of any other compound that will pass the CWZ test on British Standard 6387, Categories C, W & Z. This is a specification for performance requirements for cables required to maintain circuit integrity under fire conditions.

    Alibaba.com lists a number of Chinese companies that manufacture low smoke, halogen free compounds www.alibaba.com/halogen-free-cable-compound-manufacturers.html but you will have to do the legwork there to see if you can find one or more that fit the complete requirements.

    Likewise AlphaGary Wire and Cable products may have something. I suggest you contact them:

    AlphaGary Corporation
    170 Pioneer Drive
    Leominster, MA 01453 USA
    www.alphagary.com/

    I suggest you ask them two questions:

    A) Do they have such a compound and if not,
    B) Can they recommend a reliable North American or European compounder besides AEI
    Read More...
    kunena.post 40 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Springback' in the forum.
    Orientation

    The following quotations at the Forums from other threads and penned by Dr. Horace Pops are very important"

    “orientation”, which is a term usually associated with annealing textures that form within conductors.


    Both grain size and orientation affect the mechanical properties of annealed specimens. In the case of copper, which is very anisotropic, lower tensile elongation and LSE, coupled with higher springback occur when the final reduction in area exceeds about 90%. This practice is harmful to the performance and windability of finish magnet wire. The aforementioned properties are directly dependent upon the specific annealing texture, which is affected by the amount of cold work prior to annealing. Poorest properties also occur for aluminum at similar high reductions. In contrast to copper, however, the decrease in elongation, windability and LSE with increasing prior reduction is attributed to the resulting finer grain size.

    There was a paper written about 1967-69 by a BICC engineer discussing inline wire drawing as it relates to magnet wire. If I remember right you supposedly used a supply wire which you could reduce between 35% and 85%. If you reduced less or more then you should have a different size supply. the nice part about inline wire drawing was that you could have an enameling system that could coat 18 to 28 AWG and would only need perhaps 3 different sizes of input wire. Without inline you would have needed an input size for each finished size. You also have bigger payoff packages and slower payoff speeds.

    Also when done right, the finished enameled wire had a higher tensile strength and better ductility or a lower spring back value."

    Read More...
    kunena.post 50 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Springback' in the forum.
    Hello Again Mr Ajalloueian;

    Our magnet wire expert was not able to log in so this had to be corrected by WAI before he could even get to the web site. This is now corrected but he is obviously very busy and has not yet logged in.

    Your "hit and miss" springback problem however should be fairly straightforward to sleuth out provided that you have the exact drawing and annealing history of the conductor including that just prior to, during and after enameling. When the springback problem surfaces, something has changed and that is what you must determine.

    I suspect the problem lies in the orientation of the conductor grain structure . I believe that is where you will find your answer..

    Please let us know what you learned. Thank you.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 52 days ago